These conditions relate to the Arts Recovery Fund.

Contact us to discuss your access requirements, including submitting your application in an alternative format.

Culturally and linguistically diverse artists: We can organise interpreters for meetings as well as for the translation of applications.

Deaf and hearing-impaired artists: When contacting us, TTY users should phone 133 677 then ask for (08) 8463 5444.

Speak and Listen (speech-to-speech relay): users should phone 1300 555 727 then ask for (08) 8463 5444.

Auslan interpreters: can be arranged for meetings and to translate applications which are submitted in Auslan (in digital format).

Applicants must:

  • be professional practicing artists or arts workers / cultural workers
  • be Australian citizens or have permanent resident status
  • live in South Australia six months or more per year.

The following applicants are eligible to apply, where the primary beneficiaries of proposed activity are professional practicing artists:

  • individual artists
  • independent groups
  • small-to-medium arts organisations*
  • major arts organisations*
  • arts and cultural venues, theatres and festivals
  • local government, including for cultural tourism activity.

*includes arts and cultural organisations funded through the Department of the Premier and Cabinet, Department for Innovation and Skills and the Department for Education.

Who is ineligible:

  • Statutory Authorities and organisations funded through the National Performing Arts Partnership Framework formerly known as Major Performing Arts Companies (but can partner with an eligible applicant)
  • Contemporary music and screen sectors (this is covered under ‘what you can and can’t apply for’).

Individuals, Groups and Organisations

Your application will be ineligible if:

  • you have an outstanding acquittal for a previous grant
  • your organisation is insolvent or under administration
  • funded activity starts or has been completed before the funded activity commencement date (see Arts Recovery Fund Guidelines for date information)

What you can apply for:

  • creation, curation, development and production of new work, which may be presented live or in hybrid and digital platforms
  • remounts of existing work, reimagined for presentation in a new way
  • costs contributing towards COVID-safe presentation, including compliance and administration
  • engagement of digital expertise to assist in developing online strategies, collaborations and presentations
  • creative, commissioning and production fees and costs
  • engagement of arts workers, technical and production crew to deliver activity
  • purchase of equipment and materials directly related to digital production and presentation
  • hire of studio, gallery, venue, facilities and equipment.

What you can’t apply for

The Arts Recovery Fund does not support:

  • projects already completed, or due to be completed, before the commencement of the funding period - funding will not be provided retrospectively
  • group or organisational ‘business as usual’ activity
  • projects without professional outcomes, such as amateur productions, the self-publication of literary works, fundraising, competitions, awards and prizes
  • contemporary music projects – funding is available through the Music Development Office
  • activities associated with feature film, television or documentary production and distribution (you should contact the South Australian Film Corporation).
  • costs for study for a tertiary education qualification (undergraduate, postgraduate), including projects forming part of a course of study or graduation ceremonies
  • start-up business costs (you should contact the Department for Innovation and Skills about business start-up support).

If you’re not sure about whether your project fits the Arts South Australia’s Arts Recovery Fund, contact covidartsfund@sa.gov.au.

Please refer to the Arts Recovery Fund Guidelines.

Applications to the Fund will be assessed against the following criteria:

  • artistic merit
  • collaboration: to encourage cooperation and additional investment, including in-kind support
  • experimentation: to encourage new ways of thinking and working, and to harness digital transformation and future technologies
  • diversity: to encourage inclusion, new voices and approaches
  • leadership: to encourage sector growth and support change.

Please note: these criteria differ from those used in the Arts and Culture Grants Program.

If you need further assistance, or to discuss your application, please contact covidartsfund@sa.gov.au.

Applications are made online through the Arts South Australia Grants Portal.

All applicants should view information at Grants Portal Assistance to learn how to navigate the system.

If you need assistance, contact an Arts Recovery Fund Officer to discuss your access requirements via covidartsfund@sa.gov.au.

All Applicants

  1. Before you proceed, if you have received funding from Arts South Australia before, check that all previous funding is acquitted (check with us if you are unsure).
  2. Read the Arts Recovery Fund guidelines page.
  3. Go to the Grants Portal and scroll to the bottom of the screen – there are two orange boxes with the options to ‘sign in’ or ‘register now’.
  4. If you are a new applicant for Arts South Australia funding, you will need to register. If you are a previous applicant, but have not logged in to the portal before, email us to be issued with a temporary password. If you are a previous applicant and have a password, sign in.
  5. Once you have signed in, you will see the Available Programs page, go to the Arts Recovery Fund Program Category you wish to apply to.
  6. Click on ‘Apply’ to access the online application form.
  7. Complete the online application form and upload Key Application Attachments and relevant Support Material.

Please note: The maximum file upload per application (including all Key Application Attachments and Support Material) is 10MB.

Your application will remain in draft and can be revised at any time prior to the round closing (until you click ‘submit’).

Please Note: Late applications will not be accepted; applications which do not meet the prescribed application requirements will not be assessed.

Draft (Unsubmitted) Applications

All draft (unsubmitted) applications will be deleted from the online grants portal one month after the round closing date. Please email covidartsfund@sa.gov.au if you wish to retain access to a draft application.

Support Material

Support material assists assessors in their understanding of your application and should be relevant to your proposal and best demonstrate the quality of your current and recent past work.

What you can supply:

  • Individuals: Up to 10 images in PowerPoint AND/OR no more than 2 Video/Audio/Moving image links/URLs.
  • Groups/Organisations: Up to 20 images in PowerPoint AND/OR no more than 3 Video/Audio/Moving image links/URLs.
  • Written material: such as scripts and manuscripts, should be in PDF or Word and include no more than 10 pages of selected material.
  • A PowerPoint of images must be accompanied by an image list which includes dates and full descriptions of the works.

If you provide URLs they must be a direct link to your artistic support material. Include any passwords for protected URLs. URLs may include video, audio and written material. We recommend 10 minutes of video and/or audio recording with edited highlights of 3-5 minutes.

If you are unable to provide URLs, you can submit material in the following formats (ensure that the total size of attachments and uploads fits within the 10MB limit for each application):

  • video (QuickTime and Windows Media)
  • audio (MP3 and Windows Media).

Please note: the maximum file upload per application (including Key Application, Attachments and Support Material) is 10MB.

Support material will not be accepted after the closing date.

Budget

Complete and finalise the budget template provided in the online application form.

Use the template to provide a consolidated budget. If necessary, upload a detailed budget to the File Upload section of the template. Upload notes to Budget (including quotes to support major expenses) to the File Upload section of the template.

Rates of pay may vary depending on the skills and experience of the artist.

Please refer to the organisation links below outlining industry standards and award rates:

Budget Tips

Your budget must be a balanced income and expenditure budget. Notes to budget must include:

  • a list of expenditure items for which Arts South Australia funding is sought
  • detail of calculations for items such as box office and artist fees (include professional benchmarks for reference)
  • evidence of confirmed financial or in-kind support from other sources
  • the timing of notification for unconfirmed funds
  • a contingency statement for significant unconfirmed funds.

Acknowledgement

You will receive an automated email acknowledging submission of your application.

Assessment

Your application will be assessed against the key criteria outlined in the Fund Guidelines.

A peer assessment process applies.

Notification and Advice

After your application is assessed you will be notified of the outcome by email in advance of the funded activity commencement date for the round. Fund decisions are not subject to appeal. Unsuccessful applicants are able to seek feedback to assist with future applications by contacting us at covidartsfund@sa.gov.au

Successful applicants

Successful applicants will:

  • enter into a Funding Agreement – return of funding agreements and payment invoices is managed through our online grants portal
  • provide an artistic, statistical and financial acquittal within three months of the completion of the funding period
  • acknowledge Arts South Australia by use of our logo in all promotional materials.

Arts South Australia logo suite (ZIP, 6.0 MB)

Due to the uncertain nature of COVID-19 and community impact, up-to-date protocols continue to be issued by the South Australian Government.

We understand that COVID-19 will have an impact on the activity you apply for. Project planning should take into account COVID-19 restrictions and your application should reflect them. Assessment of your application will include consideration of COVID-19 circumstances. Please contact us if you have any questions.

To understand how the pandemic might affect your project, and the COVID-safe requirements you will need to comply with (subject to your project outcome), please consider resources at the SA Government COVID-19 website, in particular:

Arts South Australia works with artists and organisations to ensure respect and acknowledgement for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and cultures at every stage of a project’s development.

You can find out more about the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander protocols on the  Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Protocols page.

Arts South Australia has protocols for the depiction of children in funded activity. These protocols are designed to help artists and arts organisations understand their legal obligations and to establish responsible steps for artists when children are involved in the creation, exhibition or distribution of creative works (including photography, painting, printmaking, performance, sculpture, written text, drawing and digital imagery).

The South Australian Government is committed to upholding and promoting the rights of people to freedom in the practice of the arts, and to encouraging the involvement of young people and children in the arts, both as participants in the creative process and as members of an audience. However, underpinning this freedom in a civil society is the rule of law and the assumption that publicly-funded activity must abide by the law. Certain laws in South Australia impose limits and constraints designed to protect children from exploitation and harm.

The Protocols for Working with Children in Art are designed to help artists and arts organisations understand their legal obligations and to establish responsible steps for artists when they involve children in the creation, exhibition or distribution of creative works.

Further information is available from the Arts Law Centre of Australia in their information sheet Children in the creative process.

Protocols for Working with Children in Art address the depiction of children in works, exhibitions and publications that are funded by Arts South Australia. These protocols are consistent with, the Protocols for working with children in art applied by the Australia Council for the Arts, and apply to grants by our department, Carclew and Country Arts SA.

There is a growing awareness in Australia and internationally of the importance of having laws and protections to safeguard children from exploitation and harm. At the same time, advances in online and mobile media technology have opened the way for mass access to images and written material. There is potential for material to be distributed, intentionally or unintentionally, well beyond the original audience. It is in this context that artists and arts organisations must consider their legal and ethical obligations regarding the safety of children.

Statement of purpose and principle

The following protocols have been designed to help artists and arts organisations understand their legal obligations and to establish responsible steps for artists when they involve children in the creation, exhibition or distribution of creative works[1].

The protocols do not affect an applicant's eligibility to be considered for funding (although relevant applications must indicate an agreement to abide by the protocols), and they have no impact on the peer assessment process. The protocols are the minimum standards for anyone seeking Arts South Australia support, and as such are considered to be minimum contractual obligations for our funding recipients. Adherence to the law and to these protocols are a condition of funding for projects that we support.

These protocols define a child as anyone under 18 years.

Summary of obligations under these Protocols

All applicants for Arts South Australia funding

1. If you plan to work with any child, you indicate your agreement to abide by these Protocols and any relevant laws and regulations that apply in South Australia.

Note that these Protocols require you to have parental consent for employing children under the age of 15 before you commence your work[2]

2. In signing your funding agreement you commit to complying with all relevant requirements imposed by law in relation to working with children, or with images of children, as well as getting the consents required by these Protocols.

Arts South Australia may ask for a copy of required consents.

3. When you submit the acquittal report in accordance with your funding agreement, you will confirm that you complied with all relevant requirements imposed by law in relation to working with children, or with images of children, and with these Protocols.

Creation of a work of art

4. If you are working with any child under the age of 15, Arts South Australia requires that you have the consent of their parent(s) or guardian(s) before you commence the work.

Arts South Australia does not require parental consent for images that include children who happened to be in a public space, where the children were not employed by the artist and where they took no directions from the artist in the creation of the image.

5. If you are working with any child and they are to be fully or partly naked, you must comply with relevant laws which prohibit the production, dissemination or exhibition of child pornography and indecent or offensive material. If the child is under the age of 15, you will also need to provide evidence of the consent of the parent(s) or guardian(s) stating that you have explained the context for the work to the parent(s) or guardian(s) and the child, and:

  • they understand the nature and intended outcome of the work
  • they commit to direct supervision of the child while the child is naked
  • they agree it is not a 'sexual, exploitative or abusive context'.

Exhibitions and performances

6. If you are showing contemporary images involving a real child who is fully or partly naked, you must: comply with all relevant South Australian laws and regulations, give thoughtful consideration to the rights of the child, and take all reasonable steps to satisfy yourself that the artist followed the laws and regulations in force where they worked when creating the image.

If the work was created with Arts South Australia funding after 1 April 2010, the artist needs to confirm that they followed these protocols, as well as the relevant laws, and the required consents were obtained.

7. If you have any concerns about the content of any images or artworks being exhibited, Arts South Australia recommends that you have those images classified by the Classification Board prior to exhibition and follow any requirements the Board may impose. You may include costs related to classification in your project budget.

Images documenting activity in a public space, where the children were not employed by the artist and they took no directions from the artist in the creation of the image, are excluded.

Distribution

8. If you are distributing - by publication, in promotional material or through digital media - contemporary images involving a real child, you must: comply with all relevant South Australian laws and regulations, give thoughtful consideration to the rights of the child, and take all reasonable steps to satisfy yourself that the artist followed the laws and regulations in force where they worked when creating the image.

  • If you can't get that written statement from the artist, you will need to get consent from a parent or guardian - or from the 'child' if they have since turned 18 - to distribute the image.
  • If the work was created with Arts South Australia funding after 1 April 2010, the artist would need to confirm that they followed these protocols as well as the relevant laws.
  • Arts South Australia does not require parental consent for distribution of images that include children who happened to be in a public space, where the children were not employed by the artist and where they took no direction from the artist in the creation of the image.
  • Organisations whose websites host images that are independently uploaded by artists or registered members will be required to have a web policy that complies with these Protocols.

9. If you are distributing - by publication, in promotional material or through digital media - any contemporary images involving a real child who is fully or partly naked, you will need to get the images classified by the Classification Board prior to publication. You may include costs related to classification in your project budget.

  • Images of infants less than one year old are excluded.
  • Images documenting activity in a public space, where the children were not employed by the artist and took no directions from the artist in the creation of the image, are also excluded.

Protocols

Artists and arts organisations: the law and your practice

If you employ children in the course of your creative work, with or without payment, or if you present or distribute depictions of children, there are five main areas of law that may be relevant.

1. Laws concerning the employment of children

2. Laws relating to child pornography and obscenity

3. Classification and censorship laws

4. Privacy laws and laws relating to the photography or filming of children

5. Other laws that may affect an artist working with children including: court proceedings; surveillance; public nuisance; use of an image; defamation and trade practices.

If you are a resident of South Australia, or are creating, exhibiting, performing or distributing work in this state, it is essential that you understand the laws that affect you.

All applicants for Arts South Australia funding will be asked whether they intend to involve a person under the age of 18 in their activity. If you do intend to involve children in your activity, you will need to abide by these Protocols and by the relevant South Australian laws and regulations.

Applicants proposing to work interstate or overseas need to consider the laws and regulations of any other state, territory or country in which they will work. They may need to seek independent legal advice about the laws in those locations.

These Protocols are intended to achieve the following outcomes in relation to each of the following three key stages, as discussed in further detail below:

  1. Creation: Ensuring that the rights of children are protected throughout the artistic process, based on informed consent about the process and the intended outcome of the artwork
  2. Exhibition and performance: Ensuring that artworks involving images of children have been produced and will be presented with due care and sensitivity
  3. Distribution: Protecting images of children from being exploited, including use of the images beyond the original context of the creative work.

Creation of a work of art

All recipients of Arts South Australia funding must agree through their funding agreements to abide by any applicable laws and regulations governing working with children in South Australia, including with respect to:

  • the employment of children of compulsory education age
  • the establishment and maintenance of child safe environments
  • working conditions and occupational health and safety.

As a minimum standard for all funded applicants working with children, we require that a parent or guardian of every child under the age of 15 consents to their child being employed in the project, with or without financial compensation.

Please note that from 1 July 2019, new screening laws take effect in South Australia. Visit the DHS Screening website for more information.

At the conclusion of their funded activity, grant recipients will be asked to confirm that they have complied with all applicable laws and with these Protocols, which would include securing any consents required for working with children. Grant recipients will agree to give us a copy of any required consents, if requested.

We do not require parental consent for the creation of images that include children who happened to be in a public space; were not employed by the artist; and took no directions from the artist.  Bylaws and regulations may apply. Artists can refer to the Arts Law Centre's Fact Sheet 'Street Photographers Rights' at www.artslaw.com.au.

Nudity

While no South Australian law explicitly prohibits a child from being employed fully or partly naked [3] for an arts project, artists must comply with all laws relating to child pornography and indecent or offensive material.

In addition, we require written confirmation from a parent or guardian of any child under the age of 15 that the artist has explained the context for the work to them and to the child, and:

  • they understand the nature and intended outcome of the work
  • they commit to direct supervision of the child while the child is naked
  • they agree it is not a 'sexual, exploitative or abusive context'.

This confirmation must be provided to Arts South Australia before any work begins. Until we have all the required consents, Arts South Australia won't pay grant monies on any approved applications that involve children younger than 15 being fully or partly naked.

Exhibition and performance

Artists and arts organisations exhibiting or presenting depictions of children who are fully or partly naked should refer to the laws governing indecent or offensive material and child pornography in South Australia.

In addition, Arts South Australia funded exhibitors or presenters displaying contemporary images of a real child[4]  who is fully or partly naked must comply with all relevant South Australian laws and regulations; give thoughtful consideration to the rights of the child; and take all reasonable steps to ensure that they followed the laws and regulations in force when creating the image. If the work was created with Arts South Australia funding granted after 1 April 2010, the artist would need to show that the Protocols were followed and consents obtained.

Where there are concerns about the content of images or artworks being exhibited, we recommend that the exhibitor or presenter have those images classified by the Classification Board before the exhibition and follow any requirements the Board may impose. Costs relating to classification may be included in the project budget. Images of activity in a public space, where the children were not employed by the artist and took no direction from the artist in the creation of the image, are excluded.

Distribution

Distribution of depictions of children includes visual material and text, published in printed form or through digital media. Since images and written depictions can be distributed nationally and internationally, including in contexts not originally intended, greater obligations are enforced for those distributing depictions of children than for exhibitors and presenters.

These Protocols specifically cover three means of distribution: publication, promotion/marketing and online or mobile media. Where an artist or organisation pursues multiple means of distribution for one activity, only one set of permissions is required, providing it lists all the proposed means of distribution.

Arts South Australia funded artists and arts organisations distributing any contemporary images of a real child, must comply with all relevant South Australian laws and regulations; give thoughtful consideration to the rights of the child; and ensure that they followed all laws and regulations in force when creating the image.

If the work was created with Arts South Australia funds granted after 1 January 2010, the artist must confirm that the Protocols were followed and the required consents were obtained. The artist's statement must also confirm that a parent or guardian of the child gave permission to distribute the image.

If the distributing artist or organisation cannot get an artist's statement, they need permission to use the image from the parent, guardian or from the 'child' if they have since turned 18.

We do not require artists or organisations to secure parental consent for distribution of images that include children who happened to be in a public space, where the children were not employed by the artist and where they took no directions from the artist in the creation of the image.

Where the material includes contemporary images of a real child depicted fully or partly naked, the images must be classified by the Classification Board prior to distribution of the material and any requirements it imposes must be followed. Costs relating to classification may be included in the project budget.

Images of infants are excluded from this requirement.

Written depictions

These Protocols set no special requirements regarding the presentation or distribution of written depictions of children. However, artists and arts organisations are reminded that child pornography laws include prohibitions of text depicting a child in an indecent sexual context or manner. Publishers of text depictions of a child should refer to the Arts Law Centre's fact sheets for South Australia and may wish to seek legal advice.

Online and mobile media

Online and mobile media content is overseen by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA) under the Broadcasting Services Act 1992. ACMA administers a mechanism where the Australian public can lodge complaints concerning online content that is, or may be, prohibited by law. ACMA is required to apply to the Classification Board for a formal classification decision where material is hosted in, or provided from, Australia and is likely to be prohibited.

Some funded organisations host websites that support images independently uploaded by artists or registered members. These organisations should have a Web Policy or Code of Conduct which prohibits the upload of material that violates the rights of others or is unlawful, defamatory or obscene, and which gives the organisation authority to remove material that violates those standards. These organisations are asked to add provisions in their Web Policy clarifying that by uploading images of children the artists or members warrant that:

  • images were created in line with relevant state or territory laws and regulations in force at the time
  • parental consent was given for distribution of contemporary images of any child involved in making the work
  • images of fully or partly naked children have been classified by the Classification Board.

Implementation

From 1 April 2010, grant applicants have had to indicate whether they plan to work with anyone under the age of 18. Applicants who work with children must be aware of the special responsibilities and requirements spelt out in these Protocols. All grant recipients must comply with the Protocols as well as the relevant South Australian laws and regulations, and they must certify compliance as part of their Acquittal Reports.

In certain cases evidence of compliance will be required before grant monies will be paid. Organisations receiving triennial funding will be sent a notice asking them to confirm their agreement to the obligations set out in the Protocols for the remainder of their funding period.

Acknowledgements

Arts South Australia acknowledges the work of the Australia Council in the development of the original Protocols for working with children in art, and the Arts Law Centre of Australia in the research and publication of the fact sheets on the legal requirements that apply for artists and arts organisations.

Disclaimer

These Protocols are based on those originally developed by the Australia Council for the Arts. The Protocols do not represent legal advice. If you have any queries about your obligations, you should seek your own independent legal advice.

[1] 'Creative works' include photography, painting, printmaking, performance, sculpture, written text, drawing and digital imagery.

[2] For these Protocols, a child is considered to be 'employed' when he or she contributes to the work by carrying out tasks at the direction of the artist or their representative, regardless of whether the child is paid or provided another form of reward.

[3] 'Partly naked' is defined as including images of bare genitals, buttocks or female breasts

[4] 'Contemporary images of a real child' are images created in the previous 18 years representing the involvement of a person under the age of 18. Exhibition of the images could be through photographs, film and video, posters, digital projections, printmaking, sculpture.

The safety and wellbeing of everyone working in, and engaging with, the South Australian arts and cultural sector is of paramount importance.

It is a legal obligation to prevent discrimination, sexual harassment and victimisation in all areas of employment and public life, including education, provision of goods and services, and clubs and associations. This applies to the arts and cultural sector, as much as to business, government and the wider community.

Arts South Australia is committed to a zero-tolerance approach to all forms of victimisation, bullying and harassment, including sexual harassment.

The Equal Opportunity Commission provides three main services in South Australia: information, education, and assessing and resolving complaints.

The Equal Opportunity Commission has a free legal advice clinic for people facing discrimination, sexual harassment and victimisation, in partnership with the University of Adelaide. The service provides legal advice on areas of Equal Opportunity law and in drafting legal documentation, statements and preparation for conciliation and Tribunal hearings.

The Australian Human Rights Commission aims to foster greater understanding and protection of human rights in Australia and to address the human rights concerns of a broad range of individuals and groups. The Commission investigates alleged infringements under federal legislation and their website includes an extensive range of publications and guides.

A number of agencies, organisations and groups in the arts and cultural sector have Codes of Conduct or Codes of Behaviour with the aim of preventing sexual harassment and abuse.

Resources

Equal Opportunity at Work: A Handbook for Employers in South Australia is a practical guide that includes action checklists and templates for policy, procedure and Code of Conduct documents.

Theatre Network NSW Code of Behaviour

Association of Artist Managers Code of Conduct

Screen Australia Code of Conduct to Prevent Sexual Harassment

Live Performance Australia Australian Live Performance Industry Code of Practice: Discrimination, Harassment, Sexual Harassment and Bullying

All applications must provide details of arrangements relating to copyright and intellectual property associated with the proposed activity. This includes details about authenticity, cultural ownership and appropriate contracts with artists for the publishing of their work.

Copyright information and advice are available from:

We collect your personal information as is reasonably necessary for the purposes and functions of:

  • administering our grants and funding program
  • keeping you informed about relevant upcoming events, grants funding initiatives and outcomes, our services, special events or client feedback surveys as well as our activities in general
  • improving our websites and other services.

We comply with the Government’s Information Privacy Principles (PDF, 230KB) when dealing with all personal information.

The information that you provide in your application may be used for:

  • processing and assessing your application – we will provide the information to the peer assessors
  • verifying other funding income for your project – we may provide information to other agencies nominated in your application
  • processing, paying and administering your grant
  • reviewing and evaluating our funding programs, strategies, plans and services – we may contact you for this purpose
  • training
  • systems testing and process improvement
  • compiling statistics and reports.

The information included in your application is confidential, however, our staff and peer assessors will view details. Arts South Australia staff and peer assessors are bound by a Code of Conduct.

If your application is successful, the Funding Agreement and associated documents for your project may be audited, which will involve disclosure of such documents, including your personal information, to auditors for audit purposes only.

If your application is successful, your personal details and the details of your application (including support material, the amount of funding you receive, the information you provide in your reports, and text and images relating to the funded activity) may be used, with your consent, for marketing and promotion of funding outcomes and South Australian arts and culture.

This may include publication on our website and/or other Government websites, notifying your local Member of Parliament, the media, local government, the Australia Council for the Arts and State Government agencies.

Any artists or organisations receiving funding or support from Arts South Australia are asked to include our logo on any marketing and communications materials.

This logo pack contains our logo in horizontal and vertical layouts, three colour variations (blue, black and CMYK) and two graphics formats (PNG, JPG).

Arts South Australia logo pack (ZIP, 6.0 MB)

If you have questions, please email Arts South Australia, Arts Recovery Fund Covidartsfund@sa.gov.au.

Australian Business Number (ABN)

A unique identification number issued by the Australian Taxation Office to business entities. Individual applicants without an ABN may opt to have their grant auspiced by an organisation.

Acquittal

A report on funded activity and expenditure provided at the conclusion of your activity. Generally, an acquittal includes artistic, financial and statistical reporting.

Artist group

Two or more individuals working collaboratively who do not establish a legally constituted organisation. This may include collectives, such as artist run initiatives. Groups may be formed on a project-by-project or ongoing basis.

Art form area

A broad category or mode of artistic expression. Arts South Australia funds activity in the art form areas of Literature, Performing Arts and Visual Art, Craft and Design. Nominating the art form area in your application assists Arts South Australia in determining which panel will assess your application.

Arts practice

Refers to the medium or genre in which an artist works, within their art form area. For example, music, contemporary dance and theatre sit within the art form area of Performing Arts.

Arts and cultural organisation

A legally constituted organisation that delivers arts and cultural programs, projects and/or services to artists or the sector.

Arts worker / cultural worker

A person who manages, administers and/or facilitates arts and cultural activity, often for or on behalf of artists.

Auspice / auspicing body

An organisation who is paid and manages grant funding on behalf of a grant recipient who does not have an ABN and opts to have their grant auspiced. An auspicing body may withhold a portion of the grant as a fee for service. This fee can be included in the application budget.

Commercial producers and presenters

Producers and presenters of arts and cultural activity who do not receive operational funding through government and who produce or present work for profit.

Community arts and cultural development (CACD)

Community arts and cultural development encompasses collaborations between professional artists and communities based on a community’s desire to achieve artistic and social outcomes.

Community arts and cultural development is distinct from other arts practice. It is defined by the creative processes and relationships developed with community to make the art, not the art form or genre.

Contemporary music

The Music Development Office provides grants for musicians, bands, composers, directors and songwriters working in the contemporary music industry. This includes popular or alternative genres such as electronic, hip-hop and dance music, rock and country music.

(What is a) Creative?

A person who works in the arts and culture sector who may not identify as an artist but who works closely with artists to realise artistic outcomes. This includes, for example, curators, artistic directors, theatre directors, creative producers and lighting/set/costume designers.

Creative development

A process of artistic investigation in the creation of new work.

Cultural Leader

An individual who, through their work, has a strategic, big picture view of the arts and culture sector. They may be arts managers and policy influencers or lead/facilitate creative processes in the making and presentation of work. Cultural leaders are acknowledged by their peers and have a strong record of achievement in their professional practice.

Disability

We use the definition of disability included in the Disability Discrimination Act 1992

Disability Arts

Refers to arts practitioners who identify as having a disability and/or collaborate with people with disability.

Emerging artist

An artist of any age in the first five years of their professional career or who has recently made a substantial shift in their arts practice.

Established artist

An artist who has maintained a professional practice for ten years or more.

For-profit arts and cultural organisations

Includes private galleries, agents, publishers, producers and presenters.

Funded activity commencement date

The date specified in each funding round for the commencement of funded activity. Arts South Australia will not fund activity which has commenced or been completed before this date.

Funded organisation

A legally constituted arts or cultural organisation in receipt of annual or multi-year funding through the State Government.

For Arts South Australia, this includes:

  • Small-to-Medium Organisations who receive funding through Arts South Australia’s contestable program
  • Major Organisations who have a direct funding relationship with the State Government
  • Statutory Authorities (bodies established through legislation) who have a direct funding relationship with the State   Government.

Funding agreement

A legal document that outlines the terms and conditions of funding arrangements, including the recipient’s reporting obligations.

GST (Goods and Services Tax)

The value added tax of 10% on most goods and services in Australia.

In-kind

Non-cash assistance that can be included in a funding application budget, such as products or services provided at no cost. Typical in-kind contributions may include administrative support, venue costs and donations of materials or equipment.

Intellectual property

Refers to the legal property rights that arise in the material outcomes of intellectual and creative processes, such as artworks, designs and inventions. Intellectual property rights include appropriate acknowledgements and permissions to reproduce the work of the copyright owner.

Mid-career artist

An artist who has maintained a professional practice for five to ten years.

Multi-art form

Work or practice that spans art form areas.

National Performing Arts Partnership Framework Organisations

Formerly known as Major Performing Arts Companies, these are organisations funded through the National Performing Arts Partnership Framework, which is administered by the Australia Council for the Arts on behalf of the Australian Government and state governments.

Non-commercial producers and presenters:

Producers and presenters of arts and cultural activity who are eligible to receive project or operational funding through Government and who produce or present work in a not-for-profit context.

Not-for-profit:

A legally constituted organisation not operating for the profit or gain of individual members. A not-for-profit organisation can make a financial surplus from their activity, but the surplus must be used to carry out its stated purpose and must not be distributed to members or other private people.

Peer assessment

All contestable grants offered by Arts South Australia are assessed at arms-length by peer assessment.

Peers are active in the industry and selected for their professional standing and art form specific expertise. They may include artists, publishers, producers and presenters, curators and arts managers – people with a broad knowledge of arts practice across the local sector, as well as nationally.

Professional Development

An activity which assists artists, arts and cultural workers and creatives to build their professional practice and career through such things as skills or artistic development, research and networking.

Professional Practicing Artist

Someone whose artistic practice is their main profession or vocation. Distinguishing characteristics (represented in a professional CV) could include specialist training in an artistic field (formal or informal), commitment of significant time to artistic activity and a history of public presentation or publication.

Public Art and Design

Artwork in any medium that is planned and executed external to a gallery context, usually outside and physically accessible to the broader public. Public art may be permanent, temporary, ephemeral or integrated and is generally site-specific.

Statutory Authorities

South Australia’s arts and culture sector has 11 statutory authorities, encompassing the North Terrace cultural institutions and major makers and presenters funded by the Department of the Premier and Cabinet (Art Gallery of South Australia, State Library of South Australia, South Australian Museum, Country Arts SA, Carrick Hill Trust, State Theatre Company South Australia, State Opera of South Australia, Adelaide Festival, Adelaide Festival Centre Trust), the Department for Education (History Trust of South Australia) and the Department of Innovation and Skills (South Australian Film Corporation). Between them, they are responsible for the delivery of core services, programs and infrastructure across all art forms and for all arts-related purposes.

Un-funded organisation

Not-for-profit, legally constituted arts or cultural organisations that are not in receipt of annual or multi-year funding through the State Government.