Section B: Reporting required under any other act or regulation

Electricity Act 1996 and Energy Products (Safety and Efficiency) Act 2000

Section 14 - Annual Report

(1) The Technical Regulator must, within three months after the end of each financial year, deliver to the Minister a report on the Technical Regulator's operations under this Act during that financial year.

(3) The Minister must cause a copy of the report to be laid before both Houses of Parliament within 12 sitting days after his or her receipt of the report.

Section 25 - Annual Report

(1) The Technical Regulator must, within three months after the end of each financial year, deliver to the Minister a report on the Technical Regulator's administration of this Act during that financial year.

(2) The Minister must cause a copy of the report to be laid before both Houses of Parliament within 12 sitting days after his or her receipt of the report.

The Technical Regulator is a statutory office established by section 7 of the Electricity Act 1996 to regulate the state’s electricity infrastructure, electrical installations, electrical appliances and their operation. This is largely performed through the development and monitoring of technical standards. The Technical Regulator is supported by the Office of the Technical Regulator (OTR) in conducting investigations, audits and other industry monitoring activities to ensure that the South Australian public continues to receive a reliable and safe electricity supply. Minimising electricity related shocks, fatalities and incidents remains the priority.

Operations and activities from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018 are summarised below.

Electrical safety programs and reported incidents

  • 1,172 electrical installations were audited for compliance with the Electricity Act 1996 and associated regulations. Audited installations were randomly selected from lists of new connections supplied by the distribution network service provider, SA Power Networks, and other network operators. Other installations were targeted for audits due to complaints or a history of non-compliance.
  • OTR officers assisted South Australia Police on 208 occasions, including attending illegal cannabis growers’ premises where dangerous wiring, including meter bypasses, were suspected. Power was disconnected for installations deemed immediately dangerous until they could be rectified by a licensed electrician. Some of these requests by South Australia Police were to help investigate the fatalities that may have been the result of an electric shock, while others were to attend and disconnect the electricity so that their investigations could proceed safely.
  • A total of 31 expiations were issued and six electrical contractors were referred to Consumer and Business Services for breaches of the Plumbers, Gasfitters and Electricians Act 1995. In the case of owner/occupiers of premises, there were eight expiations issued against them for failing to maintain their electrical installation to an acceptable safe level.
  • There were 21,514 enquiries for interpretations or technical advice in relation to the electrical installation standards, from industry stakeholders, government departments and members of the public.
  • One electricity related death was reported, which was attributed to a homeowner removing components from a disused electrical appliance and then assembling their own homemade appliance. In the process, the victim contacted exposed live electrical connections. There were 11 electricity related major/minor incidents involving injury or significant damage (mainly solar or drug related hydroponic fires). A total of 1,079 electric shock reports were made to the Technical Regulator.

Electrical appliances retail and online activity monitoring

The Technical Regulator monitors suppliers of electrical appliances and accessories for compliance with the Energy Products (Safety and Efficiency) Act 2000. A certification service assists industry to meet compliance obligations. A total of 94 applications for product approval were processed and 34 product related incidents were investigated. As a result, six voluntary recall notices were issued following negotiations with the suppliers.

Safety awareness and education

To help maintain a good safety record within the industry and to promote public awareness, the Technical Regulator:

  • attended industry events to discuss safety and compliance issues with electrical contractors. A total of 120 presentations were delivered, covering legislation and the updated AS/NZS 3000 Wiring Rules and related standards, the introduction of electronic certificates of compliance, changes to solar photovoltaic (PV) installation standards, and reports on accidents and fatalities. Safety and technical presentations were also delivered to apprentices, industry groups and government departments. Electrical safety presentations were also delivered to South Australia Police cadets. Attended home building expos and the Caravan and Camping Show to promote electrical safety, and answer queries from the public.
  • conducted 18 presentations on the requirements for building structures and shared information about working safely near powerlines with building industry companies and local councils. OTR engineers frequently made site visits to ensure safety and regulatory compliance.
  • continued the “Be Energy Safe” campaign, with advertisements in social media, radio, print and other media to support specific campaigns, warnings and recalls.
  • provided safety brochures on request to local councils, electricity entities and the general public.
  • published two editions of the Regulation Roundup, focussing on the Wiring Rules and other electrical standards, solar PV installations and safe working practices. Copies were posted to electrical workers and contractors registered in South Australia. The publication is also available online for general access.

Expert technical input

Expert technical input was provided for the revision of key Australian Standards through representation on 14 standards committees:

EL-001 Wiring Rules
EL-001-09 Wiring Rules Drafting Subcommittee
EL-001-17 Construction and Demolition Sites Installations
EL-001-21 Testing and Inspection of Electrical Installations
EL-001-24 Generating Sets
EL-002 Safety of Household and Similar Electrical Appliances and Small Power  Transformers and Power Supplies
EL-004 Electrical Accessories
EL-042 Renewable Energy Power Supply Systems & Equipment
EL-042-03 Grid Connected Systems and Equipment
EL-042-05 Safety of battery systems for use in inverter energy systems
EL-044 Safe Working on Low-Voltage Electrical Installations
EL-052 Electrical Energy Networks, Construction and Operation
ET-007 Coordinating Committee on Power and Telecommunications (CCPT)
QR-012 Conformance Marking to Regulatory Requirements

The Technical Regulator’s Technical Advisory Committee met twice, with members from energy entities, contractor and employee associations and local government. In line with the Memorandum of Understanding, advice was provided on many occasions to the Energy and Water Ombudsman SA on customer dissatisfaction with responses from electricity entities.

Building Clearance Approvals for Structures in Proximity to Powerlines

Under section 86 of the Electricity Act 1996, 7 approvals were granted for the erection of buildings in proximity to powerlines. As standard practice, applicants were assisted in achieving compliance with building clearance distances (as specified in the regulations) before the application was formally considered.

Exemptions to Planting Restrictions

The Electricity (Principles of Vegetation Clearance) Regulations 2010 list species of vegetation that may be planted in proximity to powerlines. Two exemptions were granted for non-listed vegetation.

SA Power Networks Vegetation Management Audit

SA Power Networks’ vegetation management was audited to ensure that the requirements of Part 5 of the Electricity Act 1996 were being met. OTR officers met with SA Power Networks asset inspectors to better understand maintenance of electrical infrastructure around Adelaide. OTR officers also met with senior SA Power Networks staff to gain an understanding of how resources are allocated and prioritised to maintain their infrastructure assets.

Safety, Reliability, Maintenance and Technical Management Plans

A Safety, Reliability, Maintenance and Technical Management Plan (SRMTMP) is a licence condition for energy supply entities legislated through the Electricity Act 1996. Jointly administered by the Technical Regulator and the Essential Services Commission of South Australia, SRMTMPs must address matters prescribed in the regulations under the Electricity Act 1996. There were 45 electricity supply SRMTMPs in operation as at 30 June 2018. OTR officers visited Torrens Island Power Station, Snowtown Wind Farm and Osborne Power Station to verify that their systems were as described in their SRMTMP.

Gas Act 1997 and Energy Products (Safety and Efficiency) Act 2000

Section 14 - Annual Report

(1) The Technical Regulator must, within three months after the end of each financial year, deliver to the Minister a report on the Technical Regulator's operations during that financial year.

(2) The Minister must cause a copy of the report to be laid before both Houses of Parliament within 12 sitting days after his or her receipt of the report.

Section 25 - Annual Report

(1) The Technical Regulator must, within three months after the end of each financial year, deliver to the Minister a report on the Technical Regulator's administration of this Act during that financial year.

(2) The Minister must cause a copy of the report to be laid before both Houses of Parliament within 12 sitting days after his or her receipt of the report.

The Technical Regulator is a statutory office established by section 7 of the Gas Act 1997 to regulate the state’s gas infrastructure (distribution systems) operation, gas installations (consumer premises), gas appliances and their operation. The safety requirements are defined through the development and monitoring of technical standards for the gas industry. The Technical Regulator is supported by the Office of the Technical Regulator (OTR) to conduct investigations, audits and other industry monitoring activities to ensure that the South Australian public continues to receive a reliable and safe gas supply.

Operations and activities for 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018 are summarised below.

Gas installation and appliances – gas safety programs and reported incidents

  • All 8,673 new connections to the natural gas distribution system were subjected to a pre-connection safety check as agreed by the Technical Regulator. This is an endeavour to ensure that the system was gas tight and that the gas installation and all appliances complied with the legislation in accordance with the applicable Australian Standards. Effectiveness of this activity was verified by carrying out random audits.
  • OTR audited 58 industrial and commercial installations and 973 residential and light commercial installations. In addition, 384 ‘first fix’ pipe installations in new domestic homes under construction were audited for compliance.
  • A total of 230 warning letter/rectification orders were issued to contractors for non‑compliant installations and all were rectified by the responsible parties. Proactive audits were conducted on two caravan parks covering gas installations serving common amenities and individual installations for long term residents.
  • A total of 428 complaints relating to faulty or non-compliant gas installations or appliances were received and resolved, 41 of those involved site visits and the remainder were resolved by phone or email. In addition, OTR responded to 8,400 requests for technical interpretation or advice in relation to the gas installation standards, from industry and trade stakeholders, government departments and members of the public.
  • One gas related death was reported during the year and five gas related incidents involving injury or significant property damage were investigated. The Technical Regulator also referred one case to Consumer Business Services for licensing breaches under the Plumbers Gas Fitters and Electricians Act 1995.

Selling gas appliances; retailers and online activity

The program to audit and monitor gas appliance retailers with a view of eliminating the sale of uncertified gas appliances in South Australia targeted smaller retailers and supermarkets that are less likely to be aware of certification requirements for gas appliances. Higher attention was also given to online sales of appliances where illegal appliances are more commonly found. The objective was to increase community awareness and change the behaviours of sellers and buyers. The Technical Regulator’s gas safety campaign and monitoring activities, led to a general decrease in sales of uncertified appliances, but long-term monitoring is required to confirm any positive changes in behaviour.

Safety of gas supply

Technical audits of distribution network operators demonstrated that there were effective systems in place to manage to an acceptable level, any risks to the community arising from the operation of natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas (LP gas) distribution networks.

The amount of unaccounted for gas (UAFG) relating to the AGN natural gas distribution networks in South Australia has been confirmed to have decreased in 2017-18.

As part of its licence requirement and to ensure the safety of the community, AGN is required to have a Safety Reliability Maintenance and Technical Management Plan (SRMTMP). Within that plan, AGN has committed to a mains replacement program. The Technical Regulator can confirm that during 2017-18, AGN replaced approximately 212.8 kilometres (km) and decommissioned approximately 6.4 km of old cast iron, unprotected steel and high-density polyethylene gas mains as part of their ongoing mains replacement program. The overall progress was approximately 10.8 km ahead of the AGN annual target.

Several annual audits of the gas distribution utilities were carried out, confirming that in all cases, utilities responded in a timely and appropriate manner to a gas leak reported by the public or by their own leakage surveys.

The Technical Regulator also conducted two audits of the gas transmission operators in South Australia. The audits confirmed that the operators had sufficient resources to ensure supply of gas to the networks and customers and that appropriate means were in place to ensure the proper odorisation and gas quality specification of natural gas.

There were no deaths or personal injuries resulting from incidents on the gas distribution networks.

Industry communication and education

A total of 17 industry communication sessions with approximately 430 participants were held. These sessions were carried out in conjunction with the plumbing industry and covered legislative and technical changes, gas installation and appliance safety and audit feedback. They were open to all licensed gas workers and contractors in South Australia. In addition, three presentations were organised and two regulatory newsletters for industry stakeholders were produced.

Public safety awareness and education

The public safety awareness campaign continued across print, radio, online and social media introducing new format and designs to improve its effectiveness in changing consumer safety behaviour. Key messages included gas appliance safety and maintenance, carbon monoxide awareness and the importance of using a licensed tradesperson for all gas installation work. Results from the annual consumer safety survey highlighted an increased awareness of gas safety, and a slight increase in change of behaviour. However, the survey highlighted that the younger demographics had an overall lower awareness of risks and safety behaviours. As a result, the safety campaign will be targeting the younger demographic in the future with the aim of changing their gas safety behaviour.

Reliability of gas supply and emergency management

The Technical Regulator continued to monitor the gas supply situation in the Iron Triangle throughout the year and this has now been resolved with the pipeline lateral returning to the pre-rupture operating pressure and capacity.

The Technical Regulator also noted that the reliability of gas supply to both South Australia and Victoria has implications for South Australia’s electricity supply as both states were now heavily reliant on gas-fired power generation.

Australian Standards and regulatory committees

Expert technical advice was provided for the revision of key Australian Standards covering gas installations, gas appliance safety requirements, quality of servicing, various gas component standards, LP gas quality specification and gas distribution network management. The Technical Regulator continued to participate in industry, stakeholder and cross-jurisdiction boards, advisory groups and committees to ensure a reliable and safe gas supply and utilisation for all South Australians.

Tonsley Village Utility Providers

In parallel to the development of the Tonsley Innovation District, at the premises of the former Mitsubishi car manufacturing plant in Adelaide’s southern suburbs, a development project for residential dwellings has been put forward. Enwave Energy was selected as the supplier for electricity, natural gas and non-drinking water to the dwellings. In the early stage of the project, the Technical Regulator sent representatives from the three sectors to assist with technical enquiries and to partake in their risk assessments. Once the project is completed, Enwave Energy will be expected to submit the relevant documentation to the Technical Regulator as per the respective legislation.

Water Industry Act 2012

Section 14 - Annual Report

(1) The Technical Regulator must, within 3 months after the end of each financial year, deliver to the Minister a report on the Technical Regulator's operations during that financial year.

(2) The Technical Regulator must, cause a copy of the report to be laid before both Houses of Parliament within 12 sitting days after receipt of the report.

The Technical Regulator is a statutory office established by section 8 of the Water Industry Act 2012 (the Act) to regulate the state’s water and sewerage infrastructure and on-site plumbing, through the development, monitoring and regulation of technical standards about the water industry. The Technical Regulator is supported by the Office of the Technical Regulator (OTR) in administration of the Act and conducts investigations, audits and industry monitoring activities to ensure that the South Australian public continues to receive the safety and health benefits associated with a robust and reliable water industry.

The operations and administration activities for 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018 are summarised below.

Water and sewerage infrastructure regulation

The Technical Regulator regulates water and sewerage infrastructure through engagement and consultation with the water industry and government agencies. During 2017-18 the key focus remained on the review, approval and audit of Safety, Reliability, Maintenance and Technical Management Plans (SRMTMPs) from all water industry entities. A total of 13 SRMTMPs were approved, making a total of 51 approved SRMTMPs out of 67 licensees, and eight audits were conducted of the industry entities against their SRMTMPs.

Non-Drinking Water Guidelines

The Non-Drinking Water Guidelines for infrastructure and on-site plumbing were published and distributed to relevant stakeholders. The guidelines outline the requirements and responsibilities for installing, operating and maintaining non-drinking water systems in accordance with legislation and technical standards. Over 120 participants attended the seminar hosted by the Technical Regulator to present the guidelines and address questions.

Plumbing regulation

The Technical Regulator monitors and regulates on-site plumbing and equipment installations for compliance with the Plumbing Standard published under section 66 of the Act. To ascertain compliance, 7,581 technical and safety audits were completed of plumbing and equipment installations (including sanitary drainage systems, drinking and non-drinking water systems, fire services, heated water systems, and trade waste systems).

Cross connection control and backflow protection

The Technical Regulator is responsible for the management of cross connection control and backflow prevention devices installed on on-site water services connected to water industry entity network infrastructure. These devices prevent contaminants from entering the water network infrastructure and on-site plumbing systems. Regular monitoring and auditing of on-site water services was conducted to enforce compliance with the Act and to ensure that licensed plumbing contractors were engaged, where required.

Standards, product certification and regulatory committees

Expert technical input and advice was provided on:

  • the on-going development of the Plumbing Code of Australia, Australian Standards (including the AS/NZS 3500 Plumbing and Drainage series) and International Standards
  • product certification for the state’s plumbing industry.

The Technical Regulator contributed at a national level to the administration of the WaterMark Certification scheme and chaired the Water Industry Technical Advisory Committee as required under Section 15 of the Act.

Industry communication and consultation

Roadshows and presentations were held in metropolitan and regional locations to provide information on issues associated with the regulation of infrastructure and on-site plumbing installations, and on the amendments to the Plumbing Code of Australia and the AS/NZS 3500 Standard.

Emergency Management Act (2004)

Section 13 – Annual Report by SEMC

(1) State Emergency Management Committee (SEMC) must, on or before 30 September in each year, present a report to the Minister on the operations of SEMC during the preceding financial year.

(2) The Minister must, within 12 sitting days after receipt of a report under this section, cause copies of the report to be laid before both House of Parliament.

The State Emergency Management Committee (SEMC) is established by Section 6 of the Emergency Management Act 2004 to provide leadership and maintain oversight of emergency management planning in the state. SEMC supports the Premier as Minister for the Act, and leads initiatives requested by the Emergency Management Council (EMC) Cabinet Committee.

South Australia faces a changing landscape – the scale of natural disasters is increasing and there are new threats the state must prepare our communities and organisations for. Under the Act, SEMC is responsible for providing leadership and overseeing state emergency management planning, monitoring and evaluation, assuring state government’s capacity to deliver plans, identifying and addressing risk, and coordinating emergency management policies and strategies.

During 2017-18, SEMC delivered a range of projects aligned to its legislative responsibilities:

  • a new Strategic Framework and Plan 2017-2022 established work priorities guided by five strategic themes which reinforce the importance of shared responsibility, being adaptive to emerging threats and managing consequences of events. In the first year, activities were focussed on resilience, people at risk in emergencies, critical services during and after events, business continuity planning, governance arrangements for relief and recovery funding, strengthening governance, land use planning, countering violent extremism and crowded places mitigation
  • the State Emergency Management Plan (SEMP) was revised to ensure it reflects the changing environment and remains fit for purpose
  • the Emergency Management Assurance Framework, and associate implementation plan, was established to strengthen how SEMC monitors the capacity of agencies and organisations to carry out their functions under the SEMP
  • substantial outcomes and improvements were delivered through actions arising from the Independent Review of the Extreme Weather Event – South Australia 28 September – 5 October 2016 (Burns Review)
  • through the $1 million Preparedness and Prevention Fund, 10 projects were delivered which strengthened South Australia’s resilience, made us better prepared for disasters and in some instances reduced the likelihood or impact of threats we now face. Two projects, related to cyber risk information and training to improve safety at major events, were the first of their kind in Australia. Other projects focussed on flood monitoring, improving psychological resilience, keeping people connected to their communities and developing new plans and tools for emergency management operations. Projects were delivered in partnership with local government, industry, tertiary institutions, non-government organisations and community groups
  • eight State Strategic projects and initiatives were also supported by SEMC to enhance and strengthen plans and capabilities in areas such as resilience, animals in emergencies, disaster waste management, recovery funding reform and local government coordination.

SEMC met seven times and delivered a range of key projects. The committee also provided advice to five EMC meetings, noting there were no disaster events requiring extraordinary meetings.

Public Sector (Data Sharing) Act 2016

Section 17 – Annual Report

(1) The Minister must, as soon as practicable after each 30 June, cause a report to be prepared about the operation of this Act during the year ended on that 30 June.

(2) Without limiting subsection (1), a report relating to a year must include the following matters:

(a) in relation to the provision of public sector data pursuant to a direction of the Office for Data Analytics (ODA) under section 6(4), a list of such directions including, in respect of each direction -

  • (i) the identity of the data provider and data recipient; and
  • (ii) the nature of the data; and
  • (iii) whether the public sector data contained personal information and whether the data was, at the time of the direction, exempt public sector data;

(b) a summary of the results of data analytics work undertaken by ODA and made available to public sector agencies, the private sector and the general public;

(c) in relation to the provision of public sector data containing personal information under section 8(1), a list of all instances of such provision including the identification of the data provider and data recipient, the general nature of the data and the purpose for which the data was shared;

(d) a list of all directions made by the Minister under section 9(1), including, in respect of each direction—

  • (i) the identification of the data provider and data recipient and the general nature of the public sector data; and
  • (ii) the purpose for which the public sector data was to be provided; and
  • (iii) whether the direction related to public sector data containing personal information and whether the data was, at the time of the direction, exempt public sector data.

(e) a list of all agreements entered into pursuant to section 13(1) including, in respect of each agreement—

  • (i) the identification of the parties to the agreement and the general nature of the data being shared; and
  • (ii) whether the agreement related to the sharing of public sector data containing personal information and whether the public sector data was, at the time of sharing, exempt public sector data.

(3) The Minister must, within 6 sitting days after receipt of a report under this section, cause copies of the report to be laid before each House of the Parliament.

The Office for Data Analytics (ODA) is a unit within DPC and was established by section 6 of the Public Sector (Data Sharing) Act 2016 on 30 May 2017 to:

  • undertake data analytics work in collaboration with agencies (mostly multi-agency)
  • facilitate data sharing between other agencies
  • inform agencies about their service delivery, operations and performance
  • upskill government in evidence-based decision making using data and analytics.

Operations and activities from 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018 are summarised on the Office for Data Analytics (ODA) website www.oda.sa.gov.au.

(2) (a) in relation to the provision of public sector data pursuant to a direction of ODA under section 6(4), a list of such directions including, in respect of each direction—

  • (i) the identity of the data provider and data recipient; and  
  • (ii) the nature of the data; and
  • (iii) whether the public sector data contained personal information and whether the data was, at the time of the direction, exempt public sector data;

There were no instances of ODA, under section 6(4), directing a public sector agency to provide public sector data to ODA during the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

(b) a summary of the results of data analytics work undertaken by ODA and made available to public sector agencies, the private sector and the general public;

A summary of the results of data analytics work undertaken by ODA and made available to public sector agencies, the private sector and the general public is provided below.

  • Analysed five years of Department of Child Protection (DCP) data to identify trends and patterns of the location of incidents of child protection notification. Provided DCP with an interactive dashboard.
  • Delivered a story map showing the public through data and maps where, how, and why South Australia has invested in renewable energy. This is available to the general public through Renewables SA.
  • Built an interactive web based application with a range of existing State geospatial datasets to assist potential developers to identify areas in South Australia where hydrogen investment could be made. App available to the general public.
  • Curated the DCP Regions and Guardianship boundary data and built an interactive mapping dashboard and a series of digital maps to assist in future planning assessments. Provided to DCP.
  • Developed an analytical demonstrator that integrated multiple datasets to better understand the population need and physical building structures that could benefit from the Home Storage Subsidy Scheme. Provided to DPC.
  • Development of demographic/geographic dispersion of Child Protection risk factors and government services involved in family early intervention services. Provided to DPC.
  • Validating addresses in participating agency datasets against the Location SA dataset to assess the quality of the agencies’ address information. Results were provided to Department for Child Protection, Births, Deaths and Marriages (Attorney-General’s Department), Department for Education and Child Development, Housing SA, Department for Correctional Services.
  • Profiled participating agency datasets and provided feedback on the quality and data capture processes and made recommendations about the standards that require adopting (e.g. ABS or ISO standards). Results were provided to DCP, Births, Deaths and Marriages (Attorney-General’s Department), Department for Education and Child Development, Housing SA, Department for Correctional Services.
  • Unidentified historical data from DCP was analysed to assess the feasibility of implementing equity metrics for service provision. A preliminary analysis was provided to DCP.
  • Developed a series of Out of Home Care (OOHC) projection models aimed to test the impact on the OOHC population of different policy proposals. These models were provided to the DPC.
  • Provided DCP with a preliminary report on the quality of data collection, processing and reporting practices to improve utilisation of DCPs collected data.
  • ODA automated consolidation and analysis of government employee mobile usage and charges, received from Optus every month. The dashboard allows DPC to view trends and usage patterns of mobiles at aggregated level and individual level.
  • Identify usable tables and columns from the backend of DCP’s electronic Connected Client Case Management System (C3MS) to enable better structure for reporting and to enhance better performance of the Data Warehouse.
  • Collaborated with Department of Child Protection to formulate a set of business definitions for DCP data utilised in the Vulnerable Children Project.
  • Developed, tested and delivered an operational reporting dashboard for DCPs Multi-Agency Assessment Unit (MAAU).
  • Collaborated with Department of Human Services to formulate a set of business definitions for Youth Justice data utilised in the Vulnerable Children Project.

Section (c) data can be located via the Office for Data Analytics website.

c) in relation to the provision of public sector data containing personal information under section 8(1), a list of all instances of such provision including the identification of the data provider and data recipient, the general nature of the data and the purpose for which the data was shared;  

(d) a list of all directions made by the Minister under section 9(1), including, in respect of each direction—  

  • (i) the identification of the data provider and data recipient and the general nature of the public sector data; and  
  • (ii) the purpose for which the public sector data was to be provided; and  
  • (iii) whether the direction related to public sector data containing personal information and whether the data was, at the time of the direction, exempt public sector data;  

There were no instances of the Minister, under section 9(1), directing a public sector agency to provide public sector data to another public sector agency during the period 1 July 2017 to 30 June 2018.

(e) a list of all agreements entered into pursuant to section 13(1) including, in respect of each agreement—  

  • (i) the identification of the parties to the agreement and the general nature of the data being shared; and  
  • (ii) whether the agreement related to the sharing of public sector data containing personal information and whether the public sector data was, at the time of sharing, exempt public sector data.

A list of agreements entered into by the Minister with a relevant entity, pursuant to section 13(1) is listed below.

Agreement number Parties to the agreement Nature of the data Personal information Exempt public sector data
B122510 South Australian Country Fire Service
 
SA Power Networks
Fire footprints and projected path of the fire Nil Nil

Reporting required under the Carers’ Recognition Act 2005

The Carers’ Recognition Act 2005 is deemed applicable for the following: Department of Human Services, Department for Education, Department for Health and Wellbeing, Department of State Development, Department of Planning, Transport and Infrastructure, South Australia Police and TAFE SA. Section 7: Compliance or non-compliance with section 6 of the Carers Recognition Act 2005 and (b) if a person or body provides relevant services under a contract with the organisation (other than a contract of employment), that person's or body's compliance or non-compliance with section 6.

Nil to report.

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